Unwrapping Lazarus, a review

Unwrapping Lazarus: Freeing the Supernatural in Your Life

Dr. Pete Carter’s job description is “to bring hope wherever I am.” Unwrapping Lazarus: Freeing the Supernatural in Your Life beckons the reader to unwrap the bindings of traditions and learned religion in order to open our lives to the great and precious promises and possibilities that God has for His children–to live in freedom to experience intimacy with God.

“… let us understand that the resources of the Kingdom of heaven are at our disposal–and that our Father in heaven is more than happy for us to use them. … It is time to heal the sick, set people free, raise the dead and enjoy the goodness and greatness of our Father.”

Carter asserts that the church has shifted its focus from Jesus and the Kingdom of heaven to the sin of its people.  This shift has the church doing the work of the Holy Spirit, convicting the world of sin.

“The normal Christian life is one filled with the Spirit and experiencing miracles.”

Healings and miracles follow Dr. Carter’s ministry at North Kent Community Church in the United Kingdom. The church has established a School of Supernatural Ministry.

As a physician, Dr. Carter has seen his patients healed through his medical practice and through the miraculous work of God.

I know that the Lord heals and works miracles today. The Lord miraculously healed me of fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome on November 21, 2010, confirmed by my doctor. There is no cure for fibromyalgia. I had no hope; medicine was not working.

Before I was healed, the Lord took me on a two-year journey to unwrap my bindings of taught religion and traditional thinking, so that I could be free to experience God’s healing touch. Through Dr. Carter’s words, I relived that journey. Thank you, Dr. Carter for making that so real.

Throughout the book, Dr. Carter speaks of the freedom that the Christian can experience if she will only recognize and remove the limitations that she has placed upon God.

However, Dr. Carter writes that he knows that the reader may not agree with all that he writes, and he urges the reader to pray, study the Bible and think through what he has written, in other words be good Bereans. Thank you, Dr. Carter for this teaching.

The focus of the book shifts from miracles and healings to “falling over, laughing, crying, much joy, people so intoxicated by the Holy Spirit that they found themselves incapable of walking.”

Many such strange things happened in our church. We had to open our minds to the new things that God was doing. … I recall one of our members “swimming” across the floor, breaststroke style if I remember rightly. When asked afterward what he had been doing, he said that the Lord had invited him to swim in the river of God.

Dr. Carter writes of hosting a team from the church where the Toronto Blessing started. “It was holy chaos.”

The Bible says

For God is not a God of disorder but of peace—as in all the congregations of the Lord’s people. 1 Corinthians 14:33

Dr. Carter has written a hope-filled book that has practical teaching for today. However, gold dust, floating feathers, and “holy chaos” have been sprinkled throughout some of its chapters.

My response: Unwrap the bindings that limit God, but wrap your mind in the Word of God, so that you are free for God to work in your life.

 I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher, Chosen Books, a division of Baker Publishing Group, in exchange for my honest review.

My prayer for you

Father, thank You for Dr. Carter and his passion for spreading hope to Your children. Fill him with Your perfect wisdom and truth. Fill us all with Your wisdom and truth as we unwrap the bindings of our thinking, consume Your Word, and experience the freedom that You have for us. We love you, Lord.

Returning to play … a marriage with glimpses of heaven

Child playing

 And he [Jesus] said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Matthew 18:3

Church activities, 50-hour-plus work weeks and the business of life gradually sucked energy out of our marriage. On date nights I’d microwave leftovers as Keith turned on his favorite “Who dun it?”  No creativity, no spontaneity.

Energy roared into our home when our toddler grandson came to visit. He darted for his drawer of lids and measuring cups to prepare tea or dinner for us.

This rocket-fueled toddler delighted in running from our family room, to the kitchen through the dining room, up the two steps of the entryway and jumping off the steps into the family room, squealing as he jumped.

One morning our rocket sat straight up on our bed with a blanket over his head waiting patiently. My adrenaline pumped.

Have you seen Gage?

Where can Gage be?

He’s not in the closet.

Gage!

He’s not under the bed.

What’s this lump?

  Gage!

We rolled the giggling lump, tickled him, and laughed until our stomachs hurt.

That moment changed our lives.

About 13 years later … Often, Keith stands saluting me as I drive into the garage. He’s also been known to hide around a corner and jump out to scare me as I get close.

Elvis fills Keith’s car with rock and roll. Our garage is tight with two cars and storage racks, so Keith stops in the driveway and lets me out. I walk into the garage keeping the beat in my head (I don’t want the neighbors to see me); once in the garage, I bee-bop my way into the house. Honks or flashing headlights applaud my gyrations.

One day as we left the grocery store, Keith stopped the cart, ordered me to jump onboard, and ran pushing the cart to the car. People turned their heads and smiled; some giggled. This became a ritual. Once, a Ford F-150 pulled up beside us, and the driver stuck out his calloused hand, pointed at us, “You kids quit that, you hear?”  Laughing, he drove away.

It takes a great deal of trust to abandon formality and the business of living. It takes trust to jump onboard a grocery cart and barrel through the parking lot.

Sheer delight in play … joy in the moment … love in the air … freedom!

Casting our cares on Jesus and jumping into His arms–that’s what He requires. What joy and freedom as He catches us.

A little child taught us to return to play, bringing a piece of heaven to our marriage.

How do you play?

My prayer for you:

Father, teach Your children how to become childlike in their trust and love for You. Bless them with childlike moments of freedom as they abandon their formality and skip through their days, hands in Yours, and singing Your praises.